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Real World Math | The Algebra of Planning a Road Trip

When you plan a road trip, you use math literally every step of the way. What you may not know, however, is the right math term for what you’re calculating. So today, I’m going to walk you through a few steps of planning a road trip so you can see how Algebra helps you get from point A to point B successfully. Continue reading Real World Math | The Algebra of Planning a Road Trip

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Algebra Ch3.4 Set I #9 Solutions Manual Error

Angela’s son brought this error in the Earth cover Algebra I Solutions Manual to our attention. Thank you!

The problem (Ch3.4 #9) wording changed completely from the salamander cover to the Earth cover. However, the solution in the old and new solutions manuals is the same.  In other words, both manuals have the solution to the salamander wording of the problem. The Earth solutions manual has the wrong solution to the Earth Ch3.4 #9 problem.

Angela’s son worked it perfectly and here is his correct solution to the Earth cover Algebra I Chapter 3.4 Set 1 #9 problem.

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3-step project idea to help you learn why learning math is important

Around the world, education is not as often available as it is in more developed countries. Too many high school students that I work with here in the US take math education for granted. You see, a global perspective on mathematics and it’s place in the world is a problem we, as the adults, created–or at least allowed. Here’s what I think we can do to change that narrative and start a conversation that creates a better perspective on math and education in general.

Continue reading 3-step project idea to help you learn why learning math is important

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Algebra Ch1.Review Set I #14b Error

A question brought to us by Marybeth. Thank you!

In Jacob’s Elementary Algebra Chapter 1 Review Set I Question 14b page 51.

“What is the total number of atoms in x propane molecules as a sum?”

The Solutions Manual for Elementary Algebra on page 14 lists the answer as:

b) 3x + 5x

The “5” is a typo. The answer should be 3x + 8x.

3x carbon atoms plus 8x hydrogen atoms

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Algebra Ch2.4 Set IV

Question from Cynthia:
Answer from Dr. Callahan:
You are correct. I assume you have a blue textbook and this is on page 72. It appears the problem got updated between versions and the solutions manual did not.
The y-axis is the weight of the contestant in pounds after he (she) eats each hot dog.
Then I can see in #2 that each hot dog eaten increases their weight in a direct variation.
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Raspberry Pi and A Robot Ferris Wheel you can build at home for less than $100

Some of the links in this article are affiliate links. We don’t carry in our shop all the materials you would need to complete this activity, so we use links to share with you the products you would want to use so that you can do this activity at home. Some of those links are affiliates and we will make a small percentage commission, at no additional cost to you, if you use our links to purchase your supplies.

Have you ever wanted to build your own Lego Ferris Wheel or Train and be able to control it like a robot? Now you can!–and BONUS it counts as a math class activity. Keep reading to find out how to do it and at the bottom I’ll show you where in your Algebra II with Trig course this activity would fall so you can schedule it in your lessons.

Continue reading Raspberry Pi and A Robot Ferris Wheel you can build at home for less than $100