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Homework Help Complex Problems – Moving Deeper into Concepts

As you move deeper into each textbook (Algebra, Geometry, Calculus, etc), the problems will contain several concepts you’ve learned earlier – all in one problem.  This complexity can make it difficult to find the “how-to” or examples in the book to help us understand how to work it.

Recently, we received this question from our student support page: There doesn’t seem to be any examples or teaching that I can find that helps me solve this problem.

This is a common question – not this particular problem, but in general, as the problems develop into including several simple concepts stacked into compound calculations. However, the explanations are there, they just may be back a few, or several, chapters.

For example, Jacobs Algebra Chapter 12 Summary and Review Problem 14h.

Concepts include but are not limited to:

  • Chapter 12: Square Roots. Simplify radical as much as possible. Example of this step page 480-481
  • Chapter 5: Equations in One Variable. Specifically for this review problem, Equivalent Equations (Lesson 3) page 162-163.
  • Chapter 12: Square Roots: Radical Equations. Page 505 has examples of squaring both sides to eliminate the radical.

Math builds on itself. As you learn more and more concepts, the problems reach back and build on calculating and analyzing skills learned earlier in the book or even in an earlier course. These complex problems can be hard to find “how-to” when we just can’t see it! The solutions manual is a good resource to help with steps, but sometimes even with those steps, we need to see where it was explained or taught.

We are here to help! Send us your homework questions and let us help. Filling out this form makes it easy to be sure you’ve told us what we need to know to help you, but you can also send an email to support@askdrcallahan.com.

Be sure to tell us:

  1. the course,
  2. the chapter,
  3. the lesson,
  4. the problem,
  5. YOUR issue as best as you can explain it.

We love to help.

 

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Real World Math | The Algebra of Planning a Road Trip

When you plan a road trip, you use math literally every step of the way. What you may not know, however, is the right math term for what you’re calculating. So today, I’m going to walk you through a few steps of planning a road trip so you can see how Algebra helps you get from point A to point B successfully. Continue reading Real World Math | The Algebra of Planning a Road Trip

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Algebra Ch3.4 Set I #9 Solutions Manual Error

Angela’s son brought this error in the Earth cover Algebra I Solutions Manual to our attention. Thank you!

The problem (Ch3.4 #9) wording changed completely from the salamander cover to the Earth cover. However, the solution in the old and new solutions manuals is the same.  In other words, both manuals have the solution to the salamander wording of the problem. The Earth solutions manual has the wrong solution to the Earth Ch3.4 #9 problem.

Angela’s son worked it perfectly and here is his correct solution to the Earth cover Algebra I Chapter 3.4 Set 1 #9 problem.

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Algebra Ch1.Review Set I #14b Error

A question brought to us by Marybeth. Thank you!

In Jacob’s Elementary Algebra Chapter 1 Review Set I Question 14b page 51.

“What is the total number of atoms in x propane molecules as a sum?”

The Solutions Manual for Elementary Algebra on page 14 lists the answer as:

b) 3x + 5x

The “5” is a typo. The answer should be 3x + 8x.

3x carbon atoms plus 8x hydrogen atoms

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Raspberry Pi and A Robot Ferris Wheel you can build at home for less than $100

Some of the links in this article are affiliate links. We don’t carry in our shop all the materials you would need to complete this activity, so we use links to share with you the products you would want to use so that you can do this activity at home. Some of those links are affiliates and we will make a small percentage commission, at no additional cost to you, if you use our links to purchase your supplies.

Have you ever wanted to build your own Lego Ferris Wheel or Train and be able to control it like a robot? Now you can!–and BONUS it counts as a math class activity. Keep reading to find out how to do it and at the bottom I’ll show you where in your Algebra II with Trig course this activity would fall so you can schedule it in your lessons.

Continue reading Raspberry Pi and A Robot Ferris Wheel you can build at home for less than $100